Movie Thread

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Re: Official Movie Thread

Postby Blue Tones » Sat May 22, 2010 11:19 am

Heath Ledger didn't comitt suicide though did he. And I am sorry BA but this film is never a 2 out of 10. Film is all based on taste but still even if you don't like this film it is not a 2 out of 10. Are you saying its as bad as Saw V or The Blair Witch Project 2. I think not.
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Re: Official Movie Thread

Postby Mr-Ed » Sat May 22, 2010 3:51 pm

Yes I am saying it is as bad as Blair Witch. It Is artistic diarrhoea on a cosmic scale and is also an hour too long. It wasn't even consistent in the points it was trying to get across. For example, the Devils cigarette was the same length every time except for two scenes when it wasn’t – oh dear.

As to Heath not commiting suicide - well that's a mute point - the inquest stated "accidental overdose" but I can never see how that can be the case personally. Surely you have to be aware that taking a coctail of six prescription drugs (that included painkillers and anti-anxiety medication) is a bad thing..

As to quality preformances with Heath Ledger in, then watch Brokeback Mountain or The Dark Knight - both cracking films.
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Re: Official Movie Thread

Postby Blue Tones » Sat May 22, 2010 4:03 pm

It was accidental overdose due to a combination of drugs making the doses needed to be much smaller to kill. As for the rest it is opinion and I enjoyed it, you obviously didn't. Like I say tastes.
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Re: Movie Thread

Postby nimrod » Thu May 27, 2010 1:16 am

Killshot
Mickey Rourke
Diane Laine

"Killshot" is a reference to the job that Armand 'The Blackbird' Degas does. He is an assassin for a mob and as he tells a younger protégé, you have to plan everything and when you go in you take the shot and then leave. Ideally one shot, one 'kill shot', is all you need.

Mickey Rourke is Armand 'The Blackbird' Degas, part Native American. In the opening scenes we see a botched job where his little brother gets killed. Because of this when Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Richie Nix enters his life, Armand befriends him because he reminds him of his dead brother.

A chance encounter at a real estate office kickstarts the core of this movie. Armand and Richie go there to extort some money but married couple Diane Lane as Carmen Colson and Thomas Jane as Wayne Colson happen to be there. No one gets killed in the brief fight that ensues, but after Carmen and Wayne saw their faces the assassin's rule is that they must die. So most of the movie has Armand and Richie trying to find Carmen and Wayne while the authorities realize they are in danger so protect them by moving them to southern Missouri with fake names in the Federal Protection Program.

The story is simple,acting is up to mark especially from the sides of Diane Lane(unfaithful) and Mickey Rourke(The wrestler).

What differentiates Killshot from other numerous action movies is instead of showing frequent nonsense action & voilence, it gathered up very well as a story, defining the characters well & establishing the relationship between them.

I really liked this film (Im a Rourke fan) 8/10 from me.

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Re: Movie Thread

Postby Mr-Ed » Sun Jul 04, 2010 10:31 pm

The Damned United

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After failing to beat Poland and qualify for the 1974 World Cup, England manager Alf Ramsey is sacked and replaced by Don Revie, the highly successful manager of Leeds United. Revie is replaced at Leeds by Brian Clough, a former manager of Derby County and a fierce critic of Leeds's style of play under Revie. Much attention is called to the fact that Clough's longtime assistant, Peter Taylor has not joined him at Leeds, and Clough claims in an interview to Yorkshire Television that the team cannot possibly have been happy under Revie, due to the violent and physical nature of their game.

The film is told in terms of flash backs from 1974 to the proceding years, the first of which is a flash back to the 1967 FA Cup match between Leeds, who were at that point leading the First Division and Derby, who were struggling near the bottom of the Second Division. Clough assumes Revie to be a similar man to himself, owing to the fact that they grew up in the same part of Middlesbrough; come the day of the match however, Revie either ignores Clough or fails to make him out in the crowd upon entering Derby's Baseball Ground stadium. Derby lose 2-0 to Leeds and the dye is cast.

Clough blames the totally unneccesary brutality of the Leeds players in winning the game, though he also recognises how far they must go to compete in the top flight. He get's Taylor to find a player who can be the bedrock of his side like Bremner is for Leeds and they sign veteran Dave Mackay, along with several other young players. The club's frugal chairman, Sam Longson is extremely anxious about the investment and more so the fact that Clough didn't bother to consult him about signing Mackay. However, Derby win the Second Division title in 1969, and the following season once more face up to Leeds, the defending First Division champions... and promptly lose 5-0.

Flash forward to 1974 and when C;ough takes over he immediately alienates his Leeds players by telling them that they can throw away all their medals and trophies, because "[they] never won any of them fairly." The season starts with a Charity Shield match against FA Cup winners Liverpool, which is widely anticipated as both the final match of legendary Liverpool manager Bill Shankly and Clough's first match in charge of Leeds. However, the event is quickly marred when Leeds's captain, Billy Bremner gets into a violent on-pitch fight with Liverpool player Kevin Keegan, which results in both players being sent off, and in turn causes them to throw their shirts off and walk off the pitch bare-chested in protest. Bremner is subsequently given a two-month suspension from all competitions, meaning that Leeds will have to start the season without their influential captain.

Flash back to promotion and despite continuing clashes with the chairman over spending on players, the club beat Leeds 2-1 and move on to win their first ever League championship in 1972, meaning a European Cup campaign the following year, which eventually sees them reach the semi-finals in a tie versus Juventus. Longson, the Chairman, suggests that Clough rest his senior players in the match before; however this happens to be against Leeds, and Clough selects his best squad out of sheer pride and determination to beat Revie. This decision backfires after a particularly crunching match gives Derby a massive injury list. After the match, Bremner approaches Clough and sarcastically tells him "Good luck in Europe." Juventus quickly send the virtual reserve side packing from the European Cup, giving Clough a chance to publicly lambast Revie and Longson.

Later that year, after Taylor suffers a heart attack, Clough decides to try and secure his position by offering up his and Taylor's resignations. To his horror however, the club's board call his bluff and not only terminate their contracts, but ban them from ever setting foot in the Baseball Ground again (although Clough still sneaks into their next match as a supporter anyway). Clough is confident that the board will come to their senses and re-instate him and Taylor, but Dave Mackay is appointed manager instead, and the appointment of the popular former player mollifies the Derby fans and extinguishes any hope Clough has of getting his job back.

Subsequently, he and Taylor are offered jobs as manager and assistant respectively of Brighton & Hove Albion, and they agree to take the jobs after having a holiday in Majorca which Brighton's chairman pays for. During the holiday however Clough is approached by representatives of Leeds and agrees to take over there. Taylor on the other hand prefers the prospect of Brighton, knowing that whatever Clough achieves at Leeds it will still be with Revie's team, and after a fierce argument the two go their separate ways, with Clough taking over at Leeds and Taylor becoming Brighton manager.

Without their captain, and also suffering from major differences of opinion with Clough, Leeds suffer a horrendous start to the season and look to be in danger of relegation only one season after winning the title. After Bremner and the players air their grievances to the board, the club decides to terminate Clough's contract after 44 days - although not before he forces them to pay a huge severance package.

Afterwards, Clough agrees to do another interview with Yorkshire Television, and this time Revie is there to have his say, bringing the two face to face at last. Clough accuses Revie of being cold-hearted and fundamentally dishonest, both as a person and a football manager, and Revie in turn brands Clough inflexible and egocentric. Clough also brings up the subject of Revie's failure to acknowledge him in the 1967 FA Cup match, and Revie claims to have not known who exactly the rookie manager was at the time (a doubtful claim considering that Revie was known for meticulously researching every opponent his team faced). After the interview ends, Clough drives down to Brighton to patch things up with Taylor after kneeling and begging for forgiveness.

In the film's epilogue, Revie complete failure as England manage is highlighted - with the dosiers on opposition players proving to be as unsuccessful at international level as they were successful at club level - eventually walking out on ENgland and going to work in the Middle East where his carear nose dived with tales of financial inpropriety. This is contrasted with Brian Clough and Peter Taylor's success at Nottingham Forest winning two European Cups in successive seasons.

The acting and interplay between Michael Sheen (Clough) and Timothy Spall (Taylor) is superb and although friends and family of Clough said there was too much swaring, I have to say I didn't really notice it.

All in all a top film.
RATING 7/10

As an asside, the normal tackles that were made back in those days would put today's footballer in hospital! Let alone the heavy tackles that would today be probably classed as attempted murder. It makes you wonder how wngers of yesteryear actually plied their trade. In general today's footballer is an overpaid pansy and if they were tackled as yesterdays stars were they wouldn't move after being fouled.
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Re: Movie Thread

Postby nimrod » Sat Jul 10, 2010 12:33 am

Nowhere Boy

This is not about the Bealtes - it is a movie about a young man reuniting with his mother. The young boy just happens to be John Lennon.

Aaron Johnson is perfectly cast as John Lennon. His performance is near perfect, playing Lennon as brittle, lost, crass, sweet, caring and charismatic - much like the man himself. Kristen Scott-Thomas portrays Aunt Mimi with such aplomb that it's hard not to love Mimi despite her cool exterior and inability to openly show her emotions. Ann Maree Duff plays Lennon's mother with a complexity of spirit and if you know the lyrical references in Lennon's songs to Julia, then you will love her performance all the more.

And those is minor roles also excel. Thomas Sangster as Paul McCartney is simply excellent. The film portrays the early relationship between Paul and John. John teaching Paul not to be such a sop and Paul teaching John to be more controlled. One of the most moving scenes is when the two men embrace at Julia's funeral - a bond between two boys who both lost their mothers. The film implies that although the two deeply respected each other - it was never a truly easy relationship. Sangster lights up the screen whenever he appears.

I think the film explores why Lennon turned into what he did, his parents both deserting him at age 5 and when at age 15 he re-establishes a relationship with his mother she is tragically killed.

A superb version of the unreleased Lennon/Mcartney song 'In Spite Of All The Danger' near the end

A wonderful film IMO Im glad the Americans didnt make it.

8/10
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Re: Movie Thread

Postby nimrod » Mon Aug 09, 2010 12:21 am

Wolfman - Anthony Hopkins, Emily Blunt

dont, just dont...


2/10
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Re: Movie Thread

Postby Blue Tones » Mon Aug 09, 2010 5:53 pm

I wasn't fussed about the Lennon movie, it could have been so much better had they gone into the beatles era right the way through to his death IMO.
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Re: Movie Thread

Postby Mcfc4life » Sun Nov 07, 2010 12:27 pm

IM watchin a few films later i let youu knoww
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Re: Movie Thread

Postby nimrod » Wed Nov 24, 2010 11:21 pm

Seven Pounds - Will Smith

Movies are often hyped up by words like 'Amazing' and 'Superb' and 'Extrordinary', and in my opinion, 7 Pounds is all of these words. But all of those words are opinions, and can often be overlooked as exaggeration. This movie is, simply and utterly, good.

The acting is good. Really, really good. It's raw, emotional, and I believed every single person who was on screen. There was no tell-tale weak link, even though every actor had very emotional parts to play.

Redemption tales have been done before, but I've never seen one as heart wrenchingly beautiful as Seven Pounds.

Watch it with the one you love..

8.5/10 I loved it.
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